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Author Topic: Best post pad  (Read 736 times)

Offline Elgin

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Best post pad
« on: April 19, 2017, 01:41:25 AM »
Ive been after a new filter for my DC04 for a while since the older one is blacker than black...
So I orderd one for: 1 pound 33 pence of ebay (My Keyboard is american style and has no pound sign...) and its pretty good!
Put a spring meadow air freshner disk ontop of the motor diffuser, cut down the filter and pop him in.
Its very universal, simple offer your old filter up - mark around it and cut to size.
its quite thick so doesn't bend so you HAVE to cut it to size - I found that the hard way, almost ruined the filter
Its got the usual cottonish (wire wool style) layer at the bottom, Cotton wool in the middle, then your standard topping pad thingy.
but I was wondering if anyone else had tried them and what they though about it? or want to buy one to test?
it is found here:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Dyson-DC04-DC04i-DC05-DC08-DC19-DC29-Post-Motor-Lid-Felt-Filter-Pad-/131553137338?hash=item1ea12d92ba:m:mgZU2plg027Q3WIUWXeDg_A
didn't fancy paying 5 pound from a Dyson refurbisher by me when I can get one in a few days time for less than half that price...

Offline Croftie

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2017, 05:43:52 PM »
Hold down Alt and on the NUM pad type 0163 ;)

I need a new post filter and was wondering what to go for. Quite like the HEPA filters but what is the seal like, do you need to get some sort of a rubber seal aswell? Going into a Lime/Grey Non-Clutched DC04.

Offline Elgin

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2017, 01:18:40 AM »
Hold down Alt and on the NUM pad type oI63 ;)

I need a new post filter and was wondering what to go for. Quite like the HEPA filters but what is the seal like, do you need to get some sort of a rubber seal aswell? Going into a Lime/Grey Non-Clutched DC04.
a long time ago when i upgraded as dc04 to HEPA i just lobbed the HEPA block in

Online MVacs

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2017, 07:07:40 PM »
I need a new post filter and was wondering what to go for. Quite like the HEPA filters but what is the seal like, do you need to get some sort of a rubber seal aswell? Going into a Lime/Grey Non-Clutched DC04.

Most people dont bother with the seal.

Online beko1987

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2017, 09:00:32 PM »
The seal is a pain, I often leave it out after giving it one chance.

Also, post pads are post pads. I buy very cheap ones and their fine! Push them in, lob an air freshener on and pop the cover on, odds are once sold itll never get opened again!

I part exchanged a dc33 with a dc07 I sold 3 years ago the other week, and upon stripping it down the post pad was the cleanest part of it! Ever so slight discoloration, I put it back in!
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Online Madrat

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2017, 10:28:07 PM »
Quote
The seal is a pain, I often leave it out after giving it one chance.

Also, post pads are post pads. I buy very cheap ones and their fine! Push them in, lob an air freshener on and pop the cover on, odds are once sold itll never get opened again!

What he said  :thumbsup:

Offline Croftie

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2017, 01:32:46 AM »
Thanks fellas. Was considering the HEPA because I worry about the effectiveness of the cheapo pads. Letting the fine stuff through. I thought maybe an after market HEPA would be more effective than an after market pad.

I put a genuine pad in 2 years ago and it's completely black now, machine doesn't get used much either so thought I'd see how the HEPA went.

Anyway will just stock up on some cheap pads. I did put the genuine filter through a 15 min quick wash but it's not clean and has broken apart, bit dissapointing - wouldn't of paid 12 for a genuine one if I'd of know it'd only last 2 years. Oh well.

Offline Elgin

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2017, 01:35:50 AM »
Thanks fellas. Was considering the HEPA because I worry about the effectiveness of the cheapo pads. Letting the fine stuff through. I thought maybe an after market HEPA would be more effective than an after market pad.

I put a genuine pad in 2 years ago and it's completely black now, machine doesn't get used much either so thought I'd see how the HEPA went.

Anyway will just stock up on some cheap pads. I did put the genuine filter through a 15 min quick wash but it's not clean and has broken apart, bit dissapointing - wouldn't of paid 12 for a genuine one if I'd of know it'd only last 2 years. Oh well.
I'm not too much of an expert on motors, but i think if the filter is black in only 2 years then I think motors on way out? anyone help - im not too good with motors - thats my grandads job - hes an electricy-ian

Offline Croftie

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2017, 11:47:54 PM »
Sounds like that could be the case if the filter should last longer. It was a second hand motor put in at the same time as the new filter although the brushes had well over half left. Will crack it open and check it when I get round to a service.

Online Madrat

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #9 on: May 11, 2017, 12:18:07 AM »
2 years of motor running will produce a good amount of carbon dust, the filter has done its job in trapping it.

Online beko1987

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2017, 01:10:43 PM »
The machine I mentioned above had its original motor in, and unless they changed the filter (which might have happened) it was very clean.

But different motors will produce differing amounts. It all depends on how much use it's had, how clean the pre filter has been (strain on the motor), if it's been blocked, if it's had fine dust in it that will reach the motor, damp or dry conditions, heck, even if wan-po-lee at happy factory number 6 that produces even the genuine motors put enough magic sand in the mix for the carbon brushes probably!

It's not really something that I imagine can be scientifically tested, if your filter is black, replace it, if not then don't! As for the hepa vs pad question, the hepa well trap more, but unless you are allergic to everything you won't notice! And 3 pattern hepa filters will be just as fine as 20 Dyson ones, I've held brand new examples of both and short of getting the microscope out couldn't tell the difference! You should check and replace if needed every year anyway, so you may as well buy the cheaper pads, then the cost of ownership goes down.

Would you put 60 for 5l GM branded oil and a 25 OEM GM oil filter in your 1,000 55reg vauxhall astra and change it every 25,000 miles as the handbook states regardless of driving style, or buy 12 Valvolene from Euro Car Parts and a 2.99 Crosland oil filter and change it every 6 months/8,000 miles? I know which I would prefer!
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline Elgin

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Re: Best post pad
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2017, 10:01:17 PM »
The machine I mentioned above had its original motor in, and unless they changed the filter (which might have happened) it was very clean.

But different motors will produce differing amounts. It all depends on how much use it's had, how clean the pre filter has been (strain on the motor), if it's been blocked, if it's had fine dust in it that will reach the motor, damp or dry conditions, heck, even if wan-po-lee at happy factory number 6 that produces even the genuine motors put enough magic sand in the mix for the carbon brushes probably!

It's not really something that I imagine can be scientifically tested, if your filter is black, replace it, if not then don't! As for the hepa vs pad question, the hepa well trap more, but unless you are allergic to everything you won't notice! And 3 pattern hepa filters will be just as fine as 20 Dyson ones, I've held brand new examples of both and short of getting the microscope out couldn't tell the difference! You should check and replace if needed every year anyway, so you may as well buy the cheaper pads, then the cost of ownership goes down.

Would you put 60 for 5l GM branded oil and a 25 OEM GM oil filter in your 1,000 55reg vauxhall astra and change it every 25,000 miles as the handbook states regardless of driving style, or buy 12 Valvolene from Euro Car Parts and a 2.99 Crosland oil filter and change it every 6 months/8,000 miles? I know which I would prefer!

I would go cheap and replace

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