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Author Topic: Using WD40 on Dysons  (Read 6118 times)

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #30 on: May 09, 2017, 12:19:05 AM »
DC33.
What? Did the wd40 give you the brain damage?
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
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Offline Parwaz7862

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2017, 12:20:40 AM »
Nope I'm perfectly fine thank you   :coffee:
DC14s are tanks, just need a slightly longer motor life. Do plastic parts often break on DC14s? Nope. DC41- Sexy looking futuristic and powerful machine. Just needs a better designed cleaner head wheel and cyclone clip along with a dense metal rod in the chassis.

Online Madrat

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #32 on: May 09, 2017, 10:58:27 AM »
WD40 is made from fish oil there was a bloke on the news that rubbed it into his knees to relive arthritis. Lots of fishermen spray there  lines and lures with it 1, for lubrication 2, as bait.

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #33 on: May 09, 2017, 04:36:36 PM »
Interesting....
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
 -Michael Scott  -GeorgeJ

Online MVacs

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #34 on: May 09, 2017, 04:40:35 PM »
This what we use.



Not standard WD40.

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #35 on: May 09, 2017, 05:38:42 PM »
This what we use.

(Attachment Link)

Not standard WD40.
I think I've seen that at the hardware store.  I'll pick some up.
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
 -Michael Scott  -GeorgeJ

Offline beko1987

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #36 on: May 09, 2017, 06:14:40 PM »
Aldi have cans of lithium spray grease apparently, I keep meaning to go get some. I just use boggo car grease on bearings
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #37 on: May 09, 2017, 06:21:32 PM »
Aldi have cans of lithium spray grease apparently, I keep meaning to go get some. I just use boggo car grease on bearings
Gotta be careful.  The bearings' codes will tell you if you should use grease or oil.

That said, usually by the time we get to servicing them, it doesn't matter anyway  :)) :'(
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
 -Michael Scott  -GeorgeJ

Offline beko1987

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #38 on: May 09, 2017, 06:31:35 PM »
Exactly, by the time you have scraped out 15 years of dry old grease, got the thing turning again, filled it full of grease and refitted it so it's quieter it'll be fine. It's a hoover brushroll, not a car's wheel bearing! Also, there isn't much point oiling motor bearings on dysons, as their sealed bearings, so the oil goes nowhere near where it is supposed to 97% of the time. Either replace the bearings (608Z's I think) or replace the motor!

Again, I've never had any issue with greasing brushroll bearings, and I do every machine I get as it quietens them down!

From what I read on vacuumland ages ago, grease your balls, oil your sleeves. So a sleeve bearing, the kind Hoover used in Junior motors, where the bearing is a brass sleeve around the shaft, oil works well (although again, I've used a thin smear of grease before!). Ball bearing bearings, oil, as it holds the balls in suspension (or similar) plus doesn't fling straight out when you fire it up.

I rarely use normal WD40 for much more than sticker removal nowadays. I have a can of spray grease which I rarely use, a can of 3-in-1 oil which gets dripped into non replaceable bearings to shut them up (lux 500 etc), tin of normal motor grease for brushroll bearings, then plusgas and coppaslip for the car. Seems to do well enough. I do want to get some white lithium grease though, for helping plastic moving parts glide a bit better.

Apparently for really old stuff, sewing machine oil is the thing to use, but I don't have any of that, and my 1930's Hoover 825 was quite happy with 3 in 1 (not turned it on in 4 years, will see what it's like when I ever get round to finding all the bits and rebuilding it!

So yes, Grease your Balls, Oil your Sleeves. Save WD40 for waterproofing electrics, removing stickers and buffing up cyclone bins!
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #39 on: May 09, 2017, 06:43:29 PM »
Exactly, by the time you have scraped out 15 years of dry old grease, got the thing turning again, filled it full of grease and refitted it so it's quieter it'll be fine. It's a hoover brushroll, not a car's wheel bearing! Also, there isn't much point oiling motor bearings on dysons, as their sealed bearings, so the oil goes nowhere near where it is supposed to 97% of the time. Either replace the bearings (608Z's I think) or replace the motor!

Again, I've never had any issue with greasing brushroll bearings, and I do every machine I get as it quietens them down!

From what I read on vacuumland ages ago, grease your balls, oil your sleeves. So a sleeve bearing, the kind Hoover used in Junior motors, where the bearing is a brass sleeve around the shaft, oil works well (although again, I've used a thin smear of grease before!). Ball bearing bearings, oil, as it holds the balls in suspension (or similar) plus doesn't fling straight out when you fire it up.

I rarely use normal WD40 for much more than sticker removal nowadays. I have a can of spray grease which I rarely use, a can of 3-in-1 oil which gets dripped into non replaceable bearings to shut them up (lux 500 etc), tin of normal motor grease for brushroll bearings, then plusgas and coppaslip for the car. Seems to do well enough. I do want to get some white lithium grease though, for helping plastic moving parts glide a bit better.

Apparently for really old stuff, sewing machine oil is the thing to use, but I don't have any of that, and my 1930's Hoover 825 was quite happy with 3 in 1 (not turned it on in 4 years, will see what it's like when I ever get round to finding all the bits and rebuilding it!

So yes, Grease your Balls, Oil your Sleeves. Save WD40 for waterproofing electrics, removing stickers and buffing up cyclone bins!
You're right.  I had greased the original bearings in my DC14 and you could hear how much they quieted down.... for about 15 minutes.  Then they sounded worse than before!  At that point, having pulled the cages off, soaked it in bearing cleaner, getting it spotless and it still wouldn't spin freely, I replaced them with 2 bearings I got off of Amazon in a 10 for $10 deal.  These cheap bearings chatter alot but... screw it.  I also popped them in a 33 I refurbed and screw that too.

Oil/Grease in bearings: That sounds about right.  I figured that out ages ago with computer fans.  Using oil on sleeves works great...  oil in ball bearings just leads to a seized bearing  :boggleeye:  Fortunately there isn't much cost to a burnt fan except a slightly warmer computer  :))

I have a whole assortment of oils and greases.  I try to pick the best one for the job but sometimes I get it wrong.  Used the white lithium grease in the DC14 bearings (see the first story).....  turns out that stuff gets liquid-y when warm then flings straight out, as you said.  Oops.

Regarding the sewing machine oil: WD40 might fit the bill....  the oil left behind is very light and I believe sewing machine oil is as well.  If not, check out the oil I linked to above.  There are a few types (the one I have is brownish yellow) and it has a great applicator for most purposes.  Probably should be able to land a bottle for cheap and it will last forever.   I've had mine for at least 10 years and it's only 20% used.
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
 -Michael Scott  -GeorgeJ

Offline beko1987

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #40 on: May 09, 2017, 06:48:14 PM »
Oooh didnt see a link, I'll have a look

Your right about it lasting forever though, I've had my tin of grease for 3 years and it's just over half used! I don't fully agree with the brushroll bearings sounding louder after a greasing, when I've had machines back a few years later for a snapped belt/other issue they've always sounded fine to me (although I find DC07 Origins have a funny roar to them even with a brand new brushroll and belt).

I found the original thread I read years ago - http://www.vacuumland.org/cgi-bin/TD/TD-VIEWTHREAD.cgi?11638
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline beko1987

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #41 on: May 09, 2017, 06:51:45 PM »
The oil in your link says use in bushing type bearings, which I think is the fancy word used to describe sleeve bearings. Plus the sleeve bearings it will refer to in R/C cars will be tiny I imagine. It'll probably be fine though, and may be slightly handy for motor bearings as it could be thin enough to seep into it. But then will it soften up the dried up old grease in there? If not, then it's kind of pointless, plus is it thick enough to not just run out?

I remembered why I don't use my spray grease, it stinks! I lubed the bearing on a turbopower 2 once and it stank! Worked well on the height corrector on the Xantia though IIRC
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #42 on: May 09, 2017, 07:32:00 PM »
Oooh didnt see a link, I'll have a look

Your right about it lasting forever though, I've had my tin of grease for 3 years and it's just over half used! I don't fully agree with the brushroll bearings sounding louder after a greasing, when I've had machines back a few years later for a snapped belt/other issue they've always sounded fine to me (although I find DC07 Origins have a funny roar to them even with a brand new brushroll and belt).

I found the original thread I read years ago - http://www.vacuumland.org/cgi-bin/TD/TD-VIEWTHREAD.cgi?11638
Yeah, I believe it was like $10 back in the day.  Might be a bit more now, but it's good quality.  I've used it on everything, including door hinges.

I wasn't saying they were louder after greasing, I was saying the grease I used was wrong and the already hosed bearings were then more upset with me....

thanks, reading that link now!
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
 -Michael Scott  -GeorgeJ

Offline GeorgeJ

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #43 on: May 09, 2017, 07:33:18 PM »
The oil in your link says use in bushing type bearings, which I think is the fancy word used to describe sleeve bearings. Plus the sleeve bearings it will refer to in R/C cars will be tiny I imagine. It'll probably be fine though, and may be slightly handy for motor bearings as it could be thin enough to seep into it. But then will it soften up the dried up old grease in there? If not, then it's kind of pointless, plus is it thick enough to not just run out?

I remembered why I don't use my spray grease, it stinks! I lubed the bearing on a turbopower 2 once and it stank! Worked well on the height corrector on the Xantia though IIRC
I wouldn't use that oil for bearings, to be honest.  It's a semi-light oil.  I found it is good for joints, etc., but wouldn't put it in ball bearings.
You miss 100% of the Dysons you don't buy.  -Wayne Gretzky
 -Michael Scott  -GeorgeJ

Offline Elgin

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Re: Using WD40 on Dysons
« Reply #44 on: May 10, 2017, 01:43:49 AM »
Exactly, by the time you have scraped out 15 years of dry old grease, got the thing turning again, filled it full of grease and refitted it so it's quieter it'll be fine. It's a hoover brushroll, not a car's wheel bearing! Also, there isn't much point oiling motor bearings on dysons, as their sealed bearings, so the oil goes nowhere near where it is supposed to 97% of the time. Either replace the bearings (608Z's I think) or replace the motor!

Again, I've never had any issue with greasing brushroll bearings, and I do every machine I get as it quietens them down!

From what I read on vacuumland ages ago, grease your balls, oil your sleeves. So a sleeve bearing, the kind Hoover used in Junior motors, where the bearing is a brass sleeve around the shaft, oil works well (although again, I've used a thin smear of grease before!). Ball bearing bearings, oil, as it holds the balls in suspension (or similar) plus doesn't fling straight out when you fire it up.

I rarely use normal WD40 for much more than sticker removal nowadays. I have a can of spray grease which I rarely use, a can of 3-in-1 oil which gets dripped into non replaceable bearings to shut them up (lux 500 etc), tin of normal motor grease for brushroll bearings, then plusgas and coppaslip for the car. Seems to do well enough. I do want to get some white lithium grease though, for helping plastic moving parts glide a bit better.

Apparently for really old stuff, sewing machine oil is the thing to use, but I don't have any of that, and my 1930's Hoover 825 was quite happy with 3 in 1 (not turned it on in 4 years, will see what it's like when I ever get round to finding all the bits and rebuilding it!

So yes, Grease your Balls, Oil your Sleeves. Save WD40 for waterproofing electrics, removing stickers and buffing up cyclone bins!

On beraring note - my Fidget spinner has the same size bearing of a non-clutch dyson brushroll... Only difference being is the fidget one spins for much longer - think the dyson bearings worn... Did have to spend hours getting my fidget bearing working again - dropped the damn thing in water - bit of disk cleaner (Alcohol) and some oil later and were back to normal - except its now noisyer that it was - at least it now spins fine (I think better than before) and is no longer rusted

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