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Author Topic: The Dummies Guide to Using a Multimeter for Testing, Continuity and Vac Repairs.  (Read 5190 times)

Online ryevac

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A Ryevac guide: Everything you need to know about using a multimeter.


The only way to fail is not to try.


Offline MVacs

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    • Manchester Vacs -- The Independent Dyson Specialists
Super job and long overdue as the subject crops up so often.  :thumbsup:

For those that want a multimeter, we have some >>here<< that do everything you need one to do without breaking the bank.

Online ryevac

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 :thumbsup:

I changed it to public. Hope it's ok and not a bore !
The only way to fail is not to try.

Offline Grumpy Jim

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:thumbsup:

I changed it to public. Hope it's ok and not a bore !
Hello again Ryevac,
Would just like to put in my two pennyworth on electricity. Nothing personal, but I did try to read your post but found my eyes glazing over with all the tech jargon stuff and failed to get to the end unfortunately.

I just cannot get my head round it (the jargon) and  personally have never found the need to do so with electricity.
IMHO you do not need to know all there is to know or have a qualification in electrical work to get the job done safely.

I think the fear factor is too overdone in order to put off the keen DIY enthusiast. The words "do not try this unless you are an electrician and know what you are doing" always bring this fear factor into play, well for me anyway, I have always ignored it.

In my view, electrical jargon is (for the DIY man) only on a need to know basis, and for the most of it, you don't need to know. Example of a need to know:- The electrician needs to know EVERYTHING about his craft as he is selling his service, and he could lose everything he owns and perhaps his liberty if he gets it wrong (heaven forbid) and kills someone when working on their device or property.

However, for me it is different. I know that electricity  can kill you but I do not fear it, and my lack of technical knowhow has not prevented me doing electrical work at home. You would be amazed at the amount projects that I have done over the years at my little bungalow since around 1975, saving hundreds or thousands of pounds in electricians charges, all with the aid of:-
A book shelf full of DIY books, a helpful official company spark at my place of work (as a Van/Lorry driver), Lots of common sense, and a lot of luck (yes I have experienced a few volts through my system :-( and have survived to tell the tale. It does tend to wake you up a bit :-) and reminds you to ware rubber gloves when possible.

Anyway, I have gone on enough, my war and peace reply was in no way a reflection or criticism of your post or personal, just a bit of ranting against the electrical powers that be and their "Professionals" who just happen to know all the techy stuff that they would rather us common DIY fodder did not know about or are prevented from doing by law.

Regards,
Jim.


Offline Grumpy Jim

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:thumbsup:

I changed it to public. Hope it's ok and not a bore !
A second response to your post would be much more on topic than my electrical rant in my last reply.
I have meters and used them previously, though not to solve vac problems as I am only a recent convert to vacaholicism :)

Only used them to test plug fuses, battery strength (aa, etc.) and cable continuity. This I managed by keeping the booklet that came in the box and reading the required section, plus common sense and logic.
I would like to promote another little device to add to your meters and that is the humble little pocket screwdriver live wire tester. IMHO these little tools are worth their weight in gold simply as a life saving tool. Would not be without one (make that two) in my pocket on any electrical job.
Cheers.

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