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1
Double check all of the wires as you go

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Fit the immaculate wheels (the owner has hardwood and quarry tiles all downstairs... nice to see it's not affected by that at all...)

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Then clip the rear squeegee back down

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And we are done!

Do I recommend you do this to your own V10? No, not yet... They are still under warranty, and if you say the right words to Dyson, they probably will come and fix whatever. Just not in this case.

However, wait a few years, as these only have a 2 year guarantee which for some will be half out by now

"18. Guarantee Details
18.1 All Dyson full size machines are covered by a 5 year guarantee, and all environmental control, lighting, Supersonic and cordless products are covered by a 2 year guarantee (terms and conditions apply).

18.2 For full details of your Dyson guarantee, click here"

(which is quite funny, as on the v10 website, Dyson say the guarantee "This is the place where we can activate your guarantee and help you get the very best from your Dyson machine through its whole lifetime. " so it seems they don't trust them as much in house anymore as they used to, coupled with every consumer group across the world dropping their ratings of them as they fail, this thread might become busy in a year or so!

Thanks for reading!
2
Slot the brushroll housing into the lower chassis

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Then, insert the first part of the pivoting neck, then screw the clear head top down to sandwich it in

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Screw it together

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Fit the brushroll and end cap

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Then feed the wiring up and around the head, into it's wiring channels (being careful not to trap the wires between the clear bit and lower chassis)

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Run the wires underneath the start of the neck, clipping the black rubber holder in place too. Then bring it round to the top and run the wires into the channels

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Clip the wire top cover on

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Jumping to the other end now, feed the cables through the middle and machine end part, and wire up the machine end

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Now, you need to clip the 2 parts together, finish pushing the cables into their slots, then screw up the middle part to hold it all together, checking it still pivots about

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3
Fit the speed adjustment PCB

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And clip the slider down. It works by magic, so doesn't need to line up with anything on the PCB, it just 'knows'

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Motor now

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Slot it back together

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And clip the speed control and battery data wire in, then screw the main voltage wires down, carefully bending the ends back to right angles as you go

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Pop the motor cover on

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Then screw the motor assembly to the cyclone assembly

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Fit the battery and filter and check operation. All good? You should be if you followed this correctly!

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By this point, my saviour had delivered, so this is the new, working motor housing as I'd had this a few days now and didn't want to get chased up, I'll fix the broken one one day and send it back to be used, so assume I didn't break anything, and that all is original and well (gosh the dyson fan boys are going to have a right old laugh at this one... Ah well, if the maount of V6's I'm repairing at the moment is anything to go by these have 3/4 years before they all start to fail then who will be laughing?)

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4
Onto the bin now, and the red release latch needs fitting. The spring is actually very easy, as it's not under alot of tension, so fit the spring to the red bit, then offer the red lever up to the bin, hooking the spring over it's holder as you go, then clip the other side on

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Check it bounces with movement

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Clip the top seal back on

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Screw the bin slide back onto the cyclone

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And I fitted the seals to the bin flap, then the bin to the cyclone



It's surprisingly hard to operate the bin emptying mechanism like this, without the handle to hold! Anyway, onto electrical matters, refitting the trigger and cables

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Feed the wires through as you go

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Then screw it down (yes you will drop the screw about 17 times trying to get it to go in if it's not a magnetic driver...)

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Fit the wiring duct and screw it back down

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5
Best start wiring it up again!



But this time, we can start from the front and wire the main body - to - wand plug up and fit it back in

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Rubber seal on

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Shroud next, and I've tried to show it, but again slots have to line up for it to refit properly

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Then *click*

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The 2 halves can be bought together now

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As can the parts of the cyclone assembly

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Which is looking much cleaner

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Then screw it all together! Long screws at the top for the cyclone, shorter ones for the cone to shroud

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6
A pile not for washing

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I used my screwdriver set usually reserved for Thinkpad tinkering for this, the screws are TINY, again just like all the other modern ones

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And the screws themselves



Everything was washed, dried and polished



And reassembled! Starting by putting the foam seals back on the cones

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The middle 4 cones were slid back in (make sure the slots at the back are properly aligned)

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Clean!

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7
Now, we can see more screws

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Which splits the cyclone

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To remove the wires, push the small plug out

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Open it up and remove the terminals

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And it can be fully withdrawn

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The inner filth can be seen. I'm sure in the older Dysons the fine dust in the inner cone just fell out into the bin alot more?

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The 4 inner cones lift out

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And all the foam seals pull carefully off

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And it's apart! A nice pile for washing

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8
Removing this one screw removes the bin slide which makes it alot easier to work with

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And the first 4 screws can be removed from the central cone

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Which lifts off

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Revealing lots of stuck dust

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The rubber seal lifts off

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Next up is the shroud.

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Remove the 4 screws, then pop it out of place by the suction inlet

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Then slide it off

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The bin emptying mechanism might clean the outside of the shroud off, but like every good Dyson it doesnt touch the inside

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9
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Then the little circuit board slides out of the housing, rubber seal and all

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Next up is the housing that brings the cables up from the battery to the motor (I forgot to say, bend the ends of the mains cables flat to really help removal of the motor, and this bit!). Using a flexible screwdriver, remove the 2 screws

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Then feed the wires out, minding not to rip the tiny data wire

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Flipping the thing over, and just like the V6, one screw holds the whole shebang in

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Allowing for easy removal

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Empty!

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Onto the cyclone arrangement now

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10
Vintage Vacuum Cleaners & Appliances / Pye cambridge model 1013/LW
« Last post by ryevac on Today at 01:05:50 AM »
Decided to do something different for a change.
Had this unit in the lock up, think i bought it from an auction room or charity shop around 5 or 6 years ago !

My intention was not to restore it, but actually find any issues, get working and sell it on to someone who may collect / restore these.
It's a 60's / prob early 70's portable record player with mw/lw tuner and integrated speakers.

Faults discovered upon inspection...
radio not working
left speaker not working
turntable speed switch seized solid
main arm a lot wobbly

Radio loss was due to mode switch wafers being dirty. Quite a common thing in older radio equipment.
Left speaker was the speaker coil wire dropped off the tab, so resoldered and now ok.
Turntable speed switch was a bit of a mare, seized solid, removed turntable and the plate holding speed switch...
freed it off eventually - but noticed rust on inside of turntable and the driven rubber jocky wheel was as bad.

cleaned it up and boiled it for a few min in the kettle brought the rubber back soft.
turntable inner rust rubbed out the rust with some scotchbrite and cleaned with meths.
A drop of oil into the main motor bearing also.
Main arm - locking ring on underside removed - shaft pulled out, cleaned, ballast spring stretched, regreased and reassembled sorted that.
All moving parts, shafts cleaned and regreased.
i only have an old scratched 45, so tested speeds on this.
Radio was still tuning quite accurate compared to my old panasonic digital radio readout.
Will upload a video of the event later when my internet upload finishes on youtube



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