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Author Topic: Yet another cyclone cleaning post  (Read 6544 times)

Offline Doingitmyself

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Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« on: July 25, 2014, 02:55:12 AM »
After 13 years of good service I invested in the workshop manual and am giving my DC07 Animal a bit of a service.

I have opened up the cyclone (remove the three screws and taken off the handle) and it's surprisingly not as bad as I expected after all this time and a lot of use for pet hair etc. I've got to the point where it's suggested to wash through the cones with a pressure washer which I do not have.

Is there any way I can clean them without one?

One thought, as we have fairly strong mains water pressure here, was to get one of those old fashioned rubber shower hoses that you put on the taps, remove the shower head and pop the hose on each of the cones one by one and blasting through from the taps.

Do you think this would be affective enough? If not, any other suggestions?

Also, there was a fin fitting on the bin opening rod. It came off easily to get the handle and rod out, but looks like it will be a lot trickier to replace. Is it needed? Or can I manage without it.

Online Parwaz7862

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2014, 12:43:20 PM »
For me usually, hot water works as long as it has some water pressure, as little as a shower
DC14s are tanks, just need a slightly longer motor life. Do plastic parts often break on DC14s? Nope. DC41- Sexy looking futuristic and powerful machine. Just needs a better designed cleaner head wheel and cyclone clip along with a dense metal rod in the chassis.

Online Sleaford White

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2014, 02:52:01 PM »
Parwaz is right. I sometimes use the shower in winter. It takes ages and you get crap everywhere! As for the "fin", if it's the black thing that is attached to the rod then no, you don't need it. Some have them, most don't.

Offline beko1987

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2014, 03:16:57 PM »
What you plan to do is fine, hot pressured water everywhere! Turn it around and from the other end, then repeat! Some spray cleaner and a small brush and scrub wherever you can see too, then rinse again and into a hot place for a night will see it right as rain again!

I had a dc07 last week with the fin thing on the release rod, it didnt get refitted (it had caused a massive clog)
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline Doingitmyself

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2014, 04:17:46 PM »
Thank you!
When you say
Turn it around and from the other end

Can you explain a bit more. As far as I can see, the only access to inside the cones is down from the top, or through the rectangular hole at the bottom of the cones where the air exits the cyclone. Is there another access I'm missing?

Online Sleaford White

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2014, 05:03:13 PM »
yes. there is a piece of plastic with 4 fins on the bottom of the cyclone. One at a time pull hard and You'll feel a small click. Keep pulling on all 4 fins and the assembly will fall away. Then pull off the round holed shroud. You will see 8 rectangular holes. Blast them through. Then blast the rectangular hole on the side of the cyclone until you get clear water flow from all tubes.


Job's a guddun









Your'e not a Man U fan are you?

Offline Doingitmyself

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2014, 05:12:18 PM »
yes. there is a piece of plastic with 4 fins on the bottom of the cyclone. One at a time pull hard and You'll feel a small click. Keep pulling on all 4 fins and the assembly will fall away. Then pull off the round holed shroud. You will see 8 rectangular holes. Blast them through. Then blast the rectangular hole on the side of the cyclone until you get clear water flow from all tubes.


Job's a guddun









Your'e not a Man U fan are you?

Cool, have already removed the fins and the shroud. Will get cleaning this afternoon


No, not a Man U fan. Why do you ask?

Offline Doingitmyself

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2014, 02:10:19 AM »
Well it's had a good clean, a fair amount of muck came out (less than I expected) and now all is shiney and clean. I've set it aside to dry, has been 2 days now, but when I shake it, I can hear a small amount of water somewhere.

I have no idea where this water is, nothing comes out when I shake or tap it. Obviously I need to get it all out before I even think of putting it all back together.

Any ideas? I'm flummoxed!

Offline beko1987

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2014, 07:59:07 AM »
I leave the whole thing in the airing cupboard so the heat evaporates everything! Lots of little nooks and crannies for the water to St!
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline Doingitmyself

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2014, 01:12:26 AM »
Well it's been sat in the airing cupboard for around 2 weeks now, and there is still a little bit of water I can hear in there when I shake it :( I just can't work out where the water is. Nothing comes out in any direction with shaking or tapping.

I've tried leaving it upside down, right way up and on it's side withe the hole downwards.

Not sure what to do next. The rest of it is all clean, with new clutch and belts and new handle has had the bin release mechanism added. Just waiting for the cyclone to dry.

Next plan is to see if I can find a lead long enough to get the dehumidifier in the airing cupboard too. Heat and dehumidification, hopefully that will do it!

Offline beko1987

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2014, 01:16:44 AM »
Really? Is your hot water on...

I've never had it take that long. If you shake it in all directions does water come out? Not sure what else to suggest apart from a heat gun and extreme caution (don't do that...)
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline Doingitmyself

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2014, 01:23:16 AM »
Our hot water is kinda on, but it's a steel unvented tank, so doesn't give off as much heat as a copper would. Nothing comes out with a good shake in any direction.

It's definitely less than it was on my last post, so it is evaporating sloooooooooowly.

I will give it a good blast with a hair dryer tomorrow then a spell with the dehumidifier.

I guess there will be no way to be 100% sure it has all gone, even when I can't hear it :(

Online Parwaz7862

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2014, 03:48:24 AM »
Personally, I was impatient for my DC07 cyclone to dry and I just used it anyways, just let or dry it for an hour and used it, and it didn't kill my dyson:) water didn't go in the motor ;D
DC14s are tanks, just need a slightly longer motor life. Do plastic parts often break on DC14s? Nope. DC41- Sexy looking futuristic and powerful machine. Just needs a better designed cleaner head wheel and cyclone clip along with a dense metal rod in the chassis.

Online Parwaz7862

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2014, 03:52:41 AM »
Btw, slightly off topic, but which types of homes have airing cupboards? I live in a terraced, Victorian house in Birmingham which was built in 1894, so 120 years old, and it doesn't have an airing cupboard. My cousins house has, but their house is in Rochdale, and is a semi detached property
DC14s are tanks, just need a slightly longer motor life. Do plastic parts often break on DC14s? Nope. DC41- Sexy looking futuristic and powerful machine. Just needs a better designed cleaner head wheel and cyclone clip along with a dense metal rod in the chassis.

Offline MVacs

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Re: Yet another cyclone cleaning post
« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2014, 11:04:49 AM »
Btw, slightly off topic, but which types of homes have airing cupboards? I live in a terraced, Victorian house in Birmingham which was built in 1894, so 120 years old, and it doesn't have an airing cupboard. My cousins house has, but their house is in Rochdale, and is a semi detached property

Usually houses that don't have central heating, or if they do its an old indirect system and not a combi boiler. The cupboard is warmed by the hot water cylinder that modern systems do not have.

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