The World's #1 Vacuum Cleaner Advice, Repair, Discussion & Information Forum

Author Topic: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version  (Read 1744 times)

Offline Eddie Honda

  • Member
  • Posts: 62
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« on: January 29, 2016, 06:00:34 PM »
After searching around, not getting really getting anywhere and after much beard stroking...I finally got my later type floor tool apart for cleaning. This is what I mean by the "later" type...


DC02 Floor Tool 001 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 002 by E Honda, on Flickr

It's a bit of a faff, but it will come apart. More pics later.

Offline Eddie Honda

  • Member
  • Posts: 62
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2016, 12:10:29 AM »
First up, two screws and remove the sole plate. Easy.


DC02 Floor Tool 003 by E Honda, on Flickr

Next stage is a hard bit. Remove a wheel. There should be enough of a gap to get something in to prise the wheel off. A screw driver is no good. A cold chisel is slightly better, but better still was a pair of tyre levers. I've had the levers years for changing motorcycle tyres.


DC02 Floor Tool 004 by E Honda, on Flickr

With the wheel off the hair ball can be removed and the axle withdrawn


DC02 Floor Tool 005 by E Honda, on Flickr

Next up is the elbow, which just slides out.


DC02 Floor Tool 006 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 007 by E Honda, on Flickr

Which leave the pair of yellow pieces that make up the foot lever to deal with.


DC02 Floor Tool 008 by E Honda, on Flickr

This is another awkward bit, so back out with the tyre lever and steadily apply pressure to just give enough clearance to pop one side out of the pivot.


DC02 Floor Tool 009 by E Honda, on Flickr

That should get you to this point.


DC02 Floor Tool 010 by E Honda, on Flickr

Then it should be quite easy for the other side to pop out itself.


DC02 Floor Tool 011 by E Honda, on Flickr

Gentle pull apart the front yellow bit and release the lugs from the recesses on the other yellow bit and move it upwards over the top of the stops on the rear yellow bit.


DC02 Floor Tool 012 by E Honda, on Flickr

With that part to one side (with the springs)


DC02 Floor Tool 013 by E Honda, on Flickr

That gets you to this point.


DC02 Floor Tool 014 by E Honda, on Flickr

Unhook the lower yellow bit.


DC02 Floor Tool 015 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 016 by E Honda, on Flickr

Drop the sole plate holder down through the surround.


DC02 Floor Tool 017 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 018 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 019 by E Honda, on Flickr

And finally separate the last two bits.


DC02 Floor Tool 020 by E Honda, on Flickr

Clean the lot. Please note the edges of the stainless sole plate are ****ing sharp! My poor index finger found that one out.

When putting it back together, which is more or less the reversal of removal, note the following.

Don't try and get the yellow bit in without having the grey sole plate backing in the right place. It needs to be above the stop ledge on the surround.


DC02 Floor Tool 021 by E Honda, on Flickr

You can see it better in this bit. Sole plate backing above stop ledge at the front and one side clicked in.


DC02 Floor Tool 022 by E Honda, on Flickr

(Tyre lever tool comes out again to lever the gap open to pop the other side pivot in.)

Rear and front of the sole plate. I left the lint picker strips on and cleaned round them.


DC02 Floor Tool 023 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 024 by E Honda, on Flickr

Pop the axle in.


DC02 Floor Tool 025 by E Honda, on Flickr

You can see the serrations that grip the wheel here.


DC02 Floor Tool 026 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 027 by E Honda, on Flickr

And supporting the wheel on the edge of the bench, the loose wheel can be pushed down back on the axle by hand.

Finally you should have one nice clean floor tool like so!


DC02 Floor Tool 028 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 029 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 030 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 031 by E Honda, on Flickr


DC02 Floor Tool 032 by E Honda, on Flickr

The only differences I can see between this and the DC05 floor tool is that the DC05 has an extra slider lug for on the elbow and a plastic sole plate.

Online Parwaz7862

  • Member
  • Posts: 3201
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Dyson geek 😃
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2016, 12:15:44 AM »
Very nice write up/thread! Beko style 8) :thumbsup:
DC14s are tanks, just need a slightly longer motor life. Do plastic parts often break on DC14s? Nope. DC41- Sexy looking futuristic and powerful machine. Just needs a better designed cleaner head wheel and cyclone clip along with a dense metal rod in the chassis.

Online MVacs

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4795
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
    • Manchester Vacs -- The Independent Dyson Specialists
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2016, 01:30:52 AM »
Very nice write up/thread! Beko style 8) :thumbsup:

Indeed. We need more like that here. Great job Eddie.  :thumbsup:

Online beko1987

  • Member
  • Posts: 3873
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Let's take it apart!
    • My blog
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2016, 12:01:29 PM »
Amazing job! Those wheels can be a right bastard to remove sometimes though! And that hairball is why the wheels lock up constantly!

I have high hopes for the DC02 once you've done all this to it!
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline Eddie Honda

  • Member
  • Posts: 62
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2016, 04:38:14 PM »
Thank you for the positive comments.

I'll post some extra thoughts on wheel removal tools later.

Online Madrat

  • Member
  • Posts: 2770
  • Country: england
  • Gender: Male
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2016, 04:40:49 PM »
I've never managed to remove the wheels without damaging the unit or myself  :censored: I end up cleaning the hair out with a hair streaking hook.

Online beko1987

  • Member
  • Posts: 3873
  • Country: gb
  • Gender: Male
  • Let's take it apart!
    • My blog
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2016, 04:48:48 PM »
I damaged a wheel on the Musclehead trying to remove it. Luckly its not gummed up so doesn't need to be removed
Collector and restorer of vintage vacuums, Dyson Appreciator! Come and see my blog, where I am uploading all my mountains of brochures, manuals and other vacuum cleaner paperwork, and also my youtube channel @beko1987!

Offline Eddie Honda

  • Member
  • Posts: 62
  • Country: ie
  • Gender: Male
Re: DC02 floor tool dismantle - later version
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2016, 02:53:22 AM »
As promised, some further thoughts on wheel removal tools.

I have three motorcycle tyre levers. They are 25mm wide, about 200mm long and 5mm thick. (1" x 8" x 3/8") and flat-ish apart from the tips, which are rounded, tapered and at the tips are 2.5mm (1/10"). I think I got them from M&P. They sell loads of different types, but these look like them: http://www.mandp.co.uk/index.php/default/economy-flat.html

When the wheels are fully home, if the axle is pushed to one side, there is a gap of around 2.5mm to just sneak in the tip of the lever. The advantage of having a wide lever is obviously to spread the load, in the case of these wheels and 1 lever, across 2 webs out of the six.


DC02 Floor Tool 033 by E Honda, on Flickr

In removing anything from a shaft (or down a round hole), it goes without saying that it must be pulled evenly, or at least as evenly as can be managed. I'd avoid working around the edge a bit of a time if possible and go for the two levers opposite approach, which would mean at least 4 webs out of the six are taking the strain.

A puller can't really be used on these as the hole in the middle of the wheel is tiny (I found a 2.5mm pin punch would just about fit the hole), so there isn't very much for a puller to push up against, if you know what I mean. Also a lot of pullers, don't have particular thin feet to slide in that gap on the inside of the wheel.

Which brings us back round to pushing the wheel off the shaft squarely. Another way I can think of is to use either metal or hardwood and use a pair of forked wedges, similar to these drill chuck removal wedges.


Jacobs Chuck Removal Wedge 001 by E Honda, on Flickr

Jacobs Chuck Removal Wedge 002 by E Honda, on Flickr

Jacobs Chuck Removal Wedge 003 by E Honda, on Flickr

Pushing the wheel off the shaft bearing against all 6 webs seems like the best plan.

Lastly, I haven't tried it (yet), but if they are slim enough, and they usually are, a flat pressed steel bicycle pedal spanner (or two once you have the gap open a tad) might make a usable alternative the tyre levers.

Dyson Cylinder Spare Parts


 

 

Dyson Spare Parts

 

 

Sebo Vacuum Cleaners

 

 

Buy a Dyson DC04 Wand Handle

 

 

 

 

The Dyson Medic Blog

Dyson Spares, Parts, Advice   Follow us on Twitter

Manchester Vacson Google+

Manchester Vacs on Instagram