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Author Topic: Full Dyson Vacuum Model Numbers & Product List. With Photos. Better than Wikipedia.  (Read 2269 times)

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Dyson vacuum cleaner model numbers can be a confusing array of numbers and letters.

We publish this Dyson model range glossary in order that the Dyson vacuum cleaner model codes might be demystified somewhat.



The first Dysons: The Kleeneze Rotork Cyclon and the Apex G-Force.

To the untrained eye, the Rotork Cyclon and the G-Force are one and the same.


Left and centre are Rotorks; the G-Force is on the right.

Kleeneze Rotork Cyclon


A Kleeneze Rotork Cyclon

The first vacuum cleaner by James Dyson was called the Kleeneze Rotork Cyclon; the first production vacuum cleaner created by James Dyson.

It was not sold under the Dyson name.   

They were sold through Kleeneze’s distribution network and at the Ideal Home Exhibition through 1983 & 1984.

These (and the visually similar later Japanese G-Force machines - see below) are usually regarded as prototype Dysons, and are VERY rare. Very seldom do they come up for sale.

Around 550 Rotorks were made, for the UK market only. Nowadays they are very rare. Dyson Malmesbury has one. The Zanussi museum in Italy has one (Zanussi built them). The design museum in London has one. The Frenchay museum in Bristol has one. One of the spare parts distributors we deal with has one. A member here called Heidi has one. A shop called Killis in Sheffield has one. A couple of guys in the US and a collector in the UK we know of also have one. We have one which you can see working below and read the restoration topic >>here<<.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gNS03OTI6M" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9gNS03OTI6M</a>

There may be a few more out there.

We guestimate there are perhaps 20-30 in total remain worldwide. All in the hands of collectors, enthusiasts and museums, so very few people have seen one of these as this machine is a piece of Dyson history.

Interest in this initial model lead to licensing agreements in Japan where a slightly modified version of the “Cyclon” was sold by Apex inc. as the “G-Force”.

The Dyson G Force



The G Force was the very first Dyson that Dyson really admitted to (they never talk much about the Rotork above). It was only sold to the Japanese market. It cost around $2000 in 1991 and won a design award.


James Dyson with a G-Force.

It also was not sold under the Dyson name. James Dyson later used the money he earned from the G-Force to start up the UK Dyson company we all know.

James Dyson eventually licensed his design in Japan, the home of high-tech (like taking coals to Newcastle, no?). The Japanese loved the over-priced pink G-Force and, in 1993, the royalties allowed James to manufacture a Dyson machine under his own name, the DC01 was born. A multi-millionaire and world-wide success story was also born! 

We have one of these in our Dyson Museum, believed to be the only one in the UK apart from the one at Dyson HQ.


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The Dyson DA001 and DC01.

The first vacuum cleaner sold under the Dyson name was the DA001, launched in 1993. It was a domestic upright model that used the patented "Dual Cyclone" technology and was mostly made in Chippenham (although some very early ones are badged as being made in Bath). After a short period, it was renamed the DC01 and production later moved to Malmesbury, at the company's new factory/research centre (now only an R&D centre since production moved abroad).

The DA001/DC01 had a single motor (two variants were used: YDK and Ametek) which provided the suction and also drove the brushroll directly via a single rubber toothless belt, so was mainly designed to use on carpeted floors. It stored its hose on the back of the housing as part of the handle wand, and removing the handle wand enabled this stretch hose to be used. Dyson has retained this basic idea on their upright models to date.

This was the only Dyson upright before Cinetic machines not to use washable pre-motor filters; the filters had to be purchased and replaced every 3 months (washable ones were later sold though). It also had a choice of post motor filtration – standard or HEPA (High Efficiency Particle Arrest) according to the model purchased.

They look like this:



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They are becoming a bit retro now. Typically grey/yellow, occasionally grey/blue and on rare occasions available in the red, purple and yellow "De Stijl" colours you see above in the centre. They are not as sophisticated as later models, but they are built like a tank and last for years. They sold very well in Scotland as the Scottish Electricity Board sold them. Many are still in daily use, not only in Scotland, but all over the world today. They were never sold in the USA, but collectors have since imported some to there.

There are slight differences between standard DC01's and the early DA001 machines:

  • All DA001s are yellow and grey (no grey/blue or yellow/purple/red De Stijl made yet)
  • The cleaner head and front bumper differs a little in design - one doesn't easily fit the other
  • Original back hoses on the DA001 were about an inch shorter (but after-market ones fit either)
  • Wands on the DA001 had a white plastic collar on the end of the aluminium tube and were a tad shorter on the tube (hence the shorter hose)
  • The DA001 had a fixed soleplate and most DC01s had a revised version with a tilting cradle within the soleplate (a better explanation of that >>here<<.)

The DA001 and DC01 are essentially the same machine, the DC01 is basically a facelift of the DA001. Most parts are interchangeable, most new after-market parts fit both variants (but after-market bumpers do not fit DA001's), but if sourcing original used soleplates, cleaner heads, bottom motor housings, hoses or a wand, better to ask the question here to see if what you intend to buy will fit, or take pot luck. Because chances are the seller (unless a Dyson guru like some folk here) won't have a clue and you will be left wondering why the 5 used hose from eBay wont fit your DC01/DA001.

We have plenty of further reading and DIY repair topics on the DA001 and the DC01 in >our DA001/DC01 room<.

Dyson have long since abandoned spares supply and service for these machines, but independent specialists have most of the spares still.


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The Dyson DC02

The DC02 was the first cylinder (canister) model sold by Dyson. It was smaller and easier to carry than the preceding DC01. Its shape allowed it to sit on stairs and this design was named "stair-hugging" by Dyson. The cleaner features an extendable hose designed to work around corners and objects. To the rear of the machine, there is a pedal which retracts the cable back into the cleaner.


The Dyson DC02 De Stijl


The Dyson DC02 Recyclone

It uses the cyclone system. This model is commonly duplicated by other manufacturers, presumably because the more complicated Dyson models (Root cyclone models etc.) have better protected patents.

Typically grey with yellow fittings, some were made in white with blue fittings and a few other rarer variants existed - see below.



The model is also available in a special edition called the 'DC02 Recyclone' (see above), named such because it was the first vacuum cleaner to be made out of recycled plastic.

Dyson have long since abandoned spares supply and service for these machines, but independent specialists have most of the spares still.

We have plenty of further reading and DIY repair topics on the DC02 in >our Cylinder Dyson room<.


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The Dyson DC03



The DC03 was a lightweight, low profile upright cleaner. The only Dyson able to recline absolutely flat to go under furniture (as machines like Sebo do) They are twin cylinder machines that contain one normal cylinder and a second which contained a pair of HEPA filters.

Its suction power was much lower than other Dyson uprights due to the very small motor and narrow cyclone fitted. Their heavy-duty filtration system allowed it to survive for many years after the rest of the original Cyclone cleaners were discontinued.


Dyson DC03 models in 'Standard' and 'Absolute' colours.

Most models were grey in colour with yellow and/or yellow and purple fittings.

They were the first slim Dyson. They only weigh about 15 pounds and when reclined. Being able to be folded flat allows them to be stored on two hooks, hung on the back of a door.

The downsides are that the filters are often not washable (some later ones are), the dust collection cylinder isn't big, and the motor (and thus the suction) is less powerful than other Dysons (although adequate for most people).


Dyson DC03 'Clear' and 'Independent' models.

The two models above are the rather rare blue 'Clear' (which you can read the rebuild topic of >>here<<), and the silver 'Independent' (which you can read the rebuild topic on >>here<<.)

Despite the fact that these machines did not have blistering performance, they were a stylish machine and still have a small but enthusiastic following.

Dyson have long since abandoned spares supply and service for these machines, but independent specialists have most of the spares still.

We have plenty of further reading and DIY repair topics on the DC03 in >our DC03 room<.


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The Dyson DC04

The DC04 was the successor to the DC01 above. These models are one of the all-time best-sellers for Dyson - with good reason.


Archive shots of our original online shop photos circa 2011

James Dyson's innovative telescopic hose design made the DC04 ideal for your stairs, your car, high up places in your home and of course your carpet and laminate floors. Look at the photos above – where our model demonstrates the various included accessories – to see how truly versatile this model is.


A selection of DC04s from our museum display.

The DC04 was the successor to the original DC01. It had improved washable filters fitted as standard. Whilst the design is quite similar to the earlier DC01, they corrected a few minor design flaws. The DC04 is what we call the "Ford Transit" of Dysons - it does exactly what you want it to do without fuss. A DC04 is easier to empty, easier to use with the tools, the tools are stored on-board in a more sensible way, and it is just a nicer machine to use than the earlier models. We used to sell a lot of DC04's.


Reconditioned DC04s - Manchester Vacs circa 2012

More on model colours and variants >here< and plenty of DIY repair advice and chat in >our DC04 room<.

Dyson have long since abandoned spares supply and service for these machines, but independent specialists have most of the spares still.


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The Dyson DC05

The DC05 was the second cylinder model. It was designed as a replacement model for the DC02 (which had not been too popular) and had improved design features.

The lilac 'Motorhead' version was the first Dyson to offer a powernozzle - a floor nozzle with a motor-powered brush-roll for improved performance on carpets. Most DC05s were standard as the one in the photo here is.



Dyson have long since abandoned spares supply and service for these machines, but independent specialists have most of the spares still.

We have plenty of further reading and DIY repair topics on the DC05 in >our Cylinder Dyson room<.


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The Dyson DC06

ila_rendered
Moving GIF above the property of Dyson UK from their original site

Dyson's first robotic vacuum cleaner, equipped with the Dyson Digital Motor, had not proceeded beyond the home-trial stage by 2012, as cost and weight needed reducing. It had the ability to 'learn' the room, and to distinguish between solid objects, such as walls and furniture, and human beings, pets, etc. by utilising sensors and specially-written navigation software.



Dyson DC06 was never properly launched so they were never generally available. However, some test units, prototypes and pre-production models were made that a few are out there; mostly in the hands of Dyson and a few collectors.



The DC06 was Dyson's only foray into robotic vacuums until the launch of the 360 Eye, pictured alongside a DC06 below.

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If you happen to have one of these machines, >>get in touch with us<<, we are interested to buy it.


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The Dyson DC07

The DC07, Dyson's fourth upright vacuum cleaner produced under the Dyson name was released in the early 2000s, is given the slogan 'the original root cyclone upright'. This is appropriate because this was the first implementation of Root Cyclone technology into a vacuum cleaner. Many people were confused if this technology was any different from the previous Dual Cyclone technology (slightly better suction actually).


Reconditioned DC07s at Manchester Vacs - circa 2012

The model is very similar in features to the DC04 - but a bit more sleek. They are available in a wide variety of colours and are a great value reconditioned buy. Dyson took everything they had learned with the DC01 and DC04 and improved it to make the DC07.


A UK DC07 Origin converted to brush control specification by Manchester Vacs.

The DC07 was very popular with DIY repairers, and that popularity lead to the Unofficial Dyson DC07 Workshop Manual being written.



There are fifteen UK models of Dyson DC07, and a few other variants supplied to other countries around the world. This is not as confusing as it may seem at first glance. The variations mostly comprise which extra tools and accessories were supplied with the machines originally, which filters they were fitted with, the colour of the unit, and if the model is clutched (a brush control mechanism operated by a clutch allowing the brush roll to be switched off) or not.

Here is a list of the UK market models with colour variants:

•   DC07 Standard. Grey/Yellow.
•   DC07 Origin. Silver/Yellow.
•   DC07 All Floors. Grey/Blue.
•   DC07 Precision. Silver/Black.
•   DC07i. Purple/Yellow or Silver/Red
•   DC07 Allergy. Purple/Green, Purple/Red or Purple/Blue.
•   DC07 Animal. Silver/Lavender.
•   DC07 HEPA. Silver/White.
•   DC07 Clic. Three Tone Pink.
•   DC07 Tool Kit. Silver/Blue
•   DC07 Full Gear. Silver/Red
•   DC07 Full Kit. Purple/Lavender/Grey.

Spare parts are abundant for these machines, as anything not available from Dyson has been made after-market already or is plentiful used. They remain a popular machine despite being a few years out of production.

There is plenty of chat and DIY repair advice for the DC07 in our >>DC07 forum room<<.


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The Dyson DC08

The DC08 was cylinder (canister) machine released around 2002, incorporating the Dyson Root Cyclone technology found on the DC07. The DC08 was the replacement for the DC05. It was the first of the Dyson cylinder models to feature the new "Animal" derivative first seen on the DC07, which was claimed to mean that the cleaner was capable of dealing effectively with pet hair and dander. Animal models came with an air driven turbine floorhead and mini turbo brush for effective pet hair removal on carpets and furnishings – they also came equipped with HEPA post-motor filters.



None of the DC08 models had electric motorised floorheads. Like the DC07, the DC08 was fitted with an uprated motor giving it more suction power, handled by the new root 12 cyclone system the DC08 was equipped with. This higher power output was able to drive the main turbo floorhead without the need for a second electric motor and the extra wiring that the DC05 motorhead had.



Basic models in the DC08 range did not come with the turbine floorhead, having only the standard floor heads which were better suited to hard flooring than carpets. Unlike the DC02, the DC08 did not have storage for its small tools in the body of the cleaner. As with the DC05, tools were stored on a small caddy attached to the suction hose. The DC08 had a long production run; it was upgraded to the DC08 Telescope wrap after the launch of the DC11, to enable it to be stored more efficiently, and was eventually superseded by the DC19.

Quote
We urge spare parts buyers to exercise great caution when buying any tool or cleaner head for these models as Dyson did a lot of playing around with different tool sockets and fittings at this time. Many otherwise seemingly identical machines can have differing tool sockets, and many people make mistakes when buying spare parts that involve a tool or tool/hose socket fitting.


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The Dyson DC09

Dyson never made a DC09. Reputedly, as the numbers are associated with the DC-9 aircraft produced by McDonnell Douglas.

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The Dyson DC10

Dyson never made a DC10. Reputedly, as the numbers are associated with the DC-10 aircraft produced by McDonnell Douglas.

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The Dyson DC11

The DC11 was the first Dyson cylinder cleaner with Telescope wrap. Launched around 2003. It had two separate dust bins and cyclone assemblies to make the machine smaller when it was packed away.

ila_rendered

It was available in four variants, one coloured yellow as below, and the other was a rarer turquoise/aqua model as seen above.



The DC11 was quickly superseded by the DC08T Telescope wrap, and not produced for very long.

Below is a catalogue shot provided by one of our forum members showing the four models available.




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The Dyson DC12 and DC12 Plus



The DC12/DC12 Plus are small cylinder machines that were released exclusively in Japan. Launched in June 2003.

The digital motor fitted on these machines are about half the size and weight of conventional motors but with 50% more power.



The DC12 cost around $650 when new, and was small enough to fit inside a cube measuring 8 inches by 10 inches by 12 inches.

Here is ours; a Japanese import. 




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The Dyson DC13

Dyson never made a DC13. Reputedly, this was due to superstitious reasons surrounding the number thirteen.  :underchair:

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The Dyson DC14

In our opinion, one of Dyson's greatest ever machines. Many people regard the DC14 as the last of the "proper" Dysons; before built-in obsolescence, lower build quality and re-inventing the wheel each year with untested, unreliable, unnecessary and overly-complex engineering happened.


Olga from Manchester Vacs trying out a DC14

The DC14 was released in 2004. It is a revision of an upright vacuum cleaner with lower centre of gravity and a similar back hose to previous upright machines. The DC14 vacuum cleaner uses Dyson's "Root 8" cyclone technology, which maintains constant suction they say. The Root 8 cyclone technology on the DC14 was improved since the DC07. The DC14 comes in four variants, the standard DC14, the All Floors, the Allergy and the Animal. More of the DC14 units sold than the later DC15 Ball vacuum cleaner.



One of Dyson’s best ever sellers was the DC04. It was so good that when they face-lifted and redesigned it to create the DC07, they left many things unchanged. next, they face-lifted the DC07 and it became the DC14.

Guess what? Those mechanicals didn’t change too much then either. What this tells us is the DC14 was a machine that after two face-lifts, remained essentially the same. This suggests the basic design and mechanicals are tried and tested over several models.

This is further supported by the fact that later non-ball Dysons retained the same basic mechanicals as the DC14. The US market DC17, the DC27 and the new DC33 appear to be basically the same machine as the DC14. Albeit, face-lifted versions with a few design tweaks here and there.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZJRlvZk4nM" target="_blank">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZJRlvZk4nM</a>

It is a design honed over many years. A mechanical setup that has been tried and tested across several Dyson models over many years.


Reconditioned DC14s at Manchester Vacs 2017

There is plenty of DIY repair advice, exploded drawings, strip down threads and tutorials for the DC14 in our >>DC14 forum room<<.


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